“Just ignore it!” by Fatima Zahra El Hafa, Morocco

No matter the situation, I always prefer to confront the problem rather than just ignoring it. An accident I had last year was no exception. I was on my way home after a long and tiresome day at school. It was evening time and the street was busy with people rushing back home to rest. … Continue reading “Just ignore it!” by Fatima Zahra El Hafa, Morocco

In a men’s world by Haya Abimelech, Syria

It all started where I lived: in Syria. Our neighborhood people were more traditional than those in other areas, so if you are a girl, you aren’t supposed to go out a lot or let strange men see you. I was a very rare case. You could see me at 10 years old, waiting for … Continue reading In a men’s world by Haya Abimelech, Syria

What’s Wrong With My Gender? by Oumaima Fathi, Morocco

When I was a kid, I loved my grandfather’s job. He was a known farmer in the village. I liked the way he planted, how he took care of the farm, and his paramount mission in the family. He was the one in charge of nearly everything, while my grandma and aunts were spending most … Continue reading What’s Wrong With My Gender? by Oumaima Fathi, Morocco

Perceiving Gender Equality, by Ala Oueslati, Tunisia.

Humans have always adjusted to the needs of their communities and societies throughout history. These adjustments shaped the way we live and changed our perception of life. In modern history, everyone played a role in making adjustments and coping with the rapidly-changing circumstances of our world, because isolation was no longer an option. The interaction … Continue reading Perceiving Gender Equality, by Ala Oueslati, Tunisia.

Clandestine Attitudes by Rima, Tunisia.

This is a series of pictures taken from different hidden parts of an Arab girl’s diary. Most women I have known in my country are having two or even three parallel lives so that they can satisfy their family and the society's expectation and then a "clandestino" life where a woman can think about herself … Continue reading Clandestine Attitudes by Rima, Tunisia.